Endometrial Ablation

When a patient has heavy menstrual bleeding, non-surgical treatment have failed or are not appropriate.

Endometrial Ablation

When a patient has heavy menstrual bleeding, non-surgical treatment have failed or are not appropriate.

Overview

What is an endometrial ablation?

  • It involves a general anesthetic and a controlled cauterization of the endometrium. This is the area in which the uterus sheds during menstruation.
  • It may be a suitable alternative to hysterectomy, but has higher rates of recurrence (heavy bleeding returns) compared to hysterectomy.
  • It may not be a suitable choice when women with fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia or malignancy, or endometriosis.
When is an endometrial ablation performed?
  • When a patient has heavy menstrual bleeding, non-surgical treatments have failed or are not appropriate.
How

How is the procedure performed?

  • Location: at Wakefield Specialist Centre.
  • Anesthetic: the procedure is performed under general anesthetic, meaning a patient is asleep.
  • Duration of the operation: this depends on the extent of the disease. Mild to moderate cases may take 45 to 90 minutes. Severe cases may take 2-4 hours.
Recovery

What should I expect after endometrial ablation?

  • When you wake up: you will have an IV line in the arm or hand. Oral pain relief is usually all that is required.
  • Nights in hospital: most patients will go home the same day (day-case surgery).
  • Time off work: 1 week (back to work the following Monday).
  • When back to normal functioning: as soon as you feel able, with no pain or discomfort.

What happens afterward?

  • This will occur 6-12 weeks after the initial operation.
  • If any issues occur when discharged home, patients can contact the Wakefield Specialist Centre directly.
  • Our providers will be on call to assist when necessary.

What is an endometrial ablation?

  • It involves a general anesthetic and a controlled cauterization of the endometrium. This is the area in which the uterus sheds during menstruation.
  • It may be a suitable alternative to hysterectomy, but has higher rates of recurrence (heavy bleeding returns) compared to hysterectomy.
  • It may not be a suitable choice when women with fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia or malignancy, or endometriosis.
  • When a patient has heavy menstrual bleeding, non-surgical treatments have failed or are not appropriate.

How is the procedure performed?

  • Location: at Wakefield Specialist Centre.
  • Anesthetic: the procedure is performed under general anesthetic, meaning a patient is asleep.
  • Duration of the operation: this depends on the extent of the disease. Mild to moderate cases may take 45 to 90 minutes. Severe cases may take 2-4 hours.

What should I expect after endometrial ablation?

  • When you wake up: you will have an IV line in the arm or hand. Oral pain relief is usually all that is required.
  • Nights in hospital: most patients will go home the same day (day-case surgery).
  • Time off work: 1 week (back to work the following Monday).
  • When back to normal functioning: as soon as you feel able, with no pain or discomfort.

What happens afterward?

  • This will occur 6-12 weeks after the initial operation.
  • If any issues occur when discharged home, patients can contact the Wakefield Specialist Centre directly.
  • Our providers will be on call to assist when necessary.

Related Conditions & Treatments

Related Conditions & Treatments

Advanced training

We have advanced training in laparoscopy and have completed accredited laparoscopic units in Australia in order to further our expertise in this area.

Up-to-date technology

We are up-to-date in terms of technology and modern methods of investigation and treatment, and continue to maintain this level of advanced service.

Minimal approach

We have the ability and expertise to manage surgical procedures using minimal access approaches. This includes using keyhole surgery wherever possible.